Books

Site Cite City
David Buuck

Entopy Magazine best Non-Fiction Books of 2015
SPD Handpicked Selection - September 2015
SPD Non-Fiction Bestseller List July-September 2015

In David Buuck’s Site Cite City, the detective novel meets the essay meeting the poem in prose, which, somewhere along the way, has already bisected machine language and passed through the byways of psychogeography, making for a text as mysterious and entertaining as it is activist and knowledgeable. An invaluable contribution to everything.
    — Renee Gladman

David Buuck writes the ultimate good English, as a (détourned) English grammar handbook would have it. He makes definitive assertions and avoids tame, colorless, hesitating, non-committal language. He uses the word “not” as a means of denial or in antithesis, never as a means of evasion. His Site Cite City enacts a counter-diction that, in countering spectacle, makes visible the invisibilities making it possible— a sort of Google Glass avant la lettre (and also détourned), cutting through the city’s inevitable palimpsests. Read this book and witness our totalizing Weltanschauung, where ideology is worldview—or is it the other way around?
   — Mónica de la Torre

In which: pamphlets fall from the sky. This is “narrative theory.” As is the animal mouth, “nibbling” away. Is the capsule safe? Here is the future sex, the kind nobody has without everything else falling apart: “Total disco, total inferno.” David Buuck works at the axis of performative and civic aims to make a narrative that is clarified the more it breaks down, as much through desire as by violent or revolutionary means. As he writes: “Autobiography is never about what actually happened, but the muscle-memory in the mouth-work of the telling of it.” And in this way a book might be: a “reconfigured biopolitics.” It might be Hazmat, “pre-history”—with all the “blight and magic” you’d expect and never know otherwise. This is a fantastic book by a writer who takes us further than we knew we wanted to go. In some ways, he returns us to our positions and in others, he keeps walking away from us, into the marshlands and the failing, glittery oscillate of the grid. Toward: a “certain distance,” where the “surplus” is. At the heart of the “unsolved world.”
   — Bhanu Kapil

About the Author
David Buuck lives in Oakland, Ca. He is the author of The Shunt (Palm Press, 2009) and co-author, with Juliana Spahr, of the novel An Army of Lovers (City Lights, 2013). He is the co-founder and editor of Tripwire, a journal of poetics, and founder of BARGE, the Bay Area Research Group in Enviro-aesthetics.

Reviews and Links

Review in Jacket2 of Site Cite City
David Buuck reads from Site Cite City

Read an Excerpt at TheVolta
Author Web Site
Author Upcoming Events Page
Tripwire - Journal Edited by David Buuck
David Buuck at Penn Sound

 

 


Fall 2015

168 pages, 6 × 8 inches 
Paperback Poetry
978-0996002516

$18 U.S.
View Buy

Fall 2015

168 pages, 6 × 8 inches 
Paperback Poetry
978-0996002516

$18 U.S.
View Buy

Entopy Magazine best Non-Fiction Books of 2015
SPD Handpicked Selection - September 2015
SPD Non-Fiction Bestseller List July-September 2015

In David Buuck’s Site Cite City, the detective novel meets the essay meeting the poem in prose, which, somewhere along the way, has already bisected machine language and passed through the byways of psychogeography, making for a text as mysterious and entertaining as it is activist and knowledgeable. An invaluable contribution to everything.
    — Renee Gladman

David Buuck writes the ultimate good English, as a (détourned) English grammar handbook would have it. He makes definitive assertions and avoids tame, colorless, hesitating, non-committal language. He uses the word “not” as a means of denial or in antithesis, never as a means of evasion. His Site Cite City enacts a counter-diction that, in countering spectacle, makes visible the invisibilities making it possible— a sort of Google Glass avant la lettre (and also détourned), cutting through the city’s inevitable palimpsests. Read this book and witness our totalizing Weltanschauung, where ideology is worldview—or is it the other way around?
   — Mónica de la Torre

In which: pamphlets fall from the sky. This is “narrative theory.” As is the animal mouth, “nibbling” away. Is the capsule safe? Here is the future sex, the kind nobody has without everything else falling apart: “Total disco, total inferno.” David Buuck works at the axis of performative and civic aims to make a narrative that is clarified the more it breaks down, as much through desire as by violent or revolutionary means. As he writes: “Autobiography is never about what actually happened, but the muscle-memory in the mouth-work of the telling of it.” And in this way a book might be: a “reconfigured biopolitics.” It might be Hazmat, “pre-history”—with all the “blight and magic” you’d expect and never know otherwise. This is a fantastic book by a writer who takes us further than we knew we wanted to go. In some ways, he returns us to our positions and in others, he keeps walking away from us, into the marshlands and the failing, glittery oscillate of the grid. Toward: a “certain distance,” where the “surplus” is. At the heart of the “unsolved world.”
   — Bhanu Kapil

About the Author
David Buuck lives in Oakland, Ca. He is the author of The Shunt (Palm Press, 2009) and co-author, with Juliana Spahr, of the novel An Army of Lovers (City Lights, 2013). He is the co-founder and editor of Tripwire, a journal of poetics, and founder of BARGE, the Bay Area Research Group in Enviro-aesthetics.

Reviews and Links

Review in Jacket2 of Site Cite City
David Buuck reads from Site Cite City

Read an Excerpt at TheVolta
Author Web Site
Author Upcoming Events Page
Tripwire - Journal Edited by David Buuck
David Buuck at Penn Sound